Verse of the Day

Daily Devotion 

By:  Bro. Bob Maynard
 

23 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                                   Living as Servants of the New Covenant

Not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think of anything as being from ourselves, but our sufficiency is from God, who also made us sufficient as ministers of the new covenant, not of the letter but of the Spirit; for the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life. (2Co_3:5-6)

We who follow the Lord Jesus Christ are “ministers of the new covenant.” The term “minister” means servant. The phrase “new covenant” speaks of relating to God by grace. Thus, we are those who serve God by the resources of His grace. Our day by day lives, lived in service of the Lord God Almighty, are to be developed by the grace of God at work in us. What is involved in this biblical, heavenly approach to life here on earth?

The first issue pertains to our own inadequacy. “Not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think of anything as being from ourselves.” So often we overlook our personal insufficiency or try to convince ourselves that we can become sufficient, with just a little more time, effort, or preparation. This approach is in direct disagreement with the Lord. God wants us to agree with Him.

Even when we begin to face our spiritual inability to produce the kind of life God is looking for, we easily underestimate the extent of our deficiency. We may think that we are just not able to produce as much as God desires to see in our lives. The Lord has a more radical viewpoint. He says that we are not able to supply “anything” that He wants to see. Again, God wants us to agree with Him.

The second issue pertains to God’s adequacy. “Our sufficiency is from God.” The sufficient resources for living the Christian life are to be found in God alone. We are to be the recipients of God’s grace, that is, His fully adequate supply. We are not to think we are the manufacturers of that grace. God is our source of all that is needed for godly living. Once more, God wants us to agree with Him.

The difference between living by God’s supply or by our own resources is a “life and death” matter. “The letter kills, but the Spirit gives life.” Living the Christian life by our own capabilities will spiritually kill us. It will eventually leave us exhausted, discouraged, condemned. Whereas, depending upon the Spirit of God to supply the abundant grace of God leaves us strengthened, encouraged, and comforted.

Prayer:

Lord God of all Grace, I humbly admit that I have often held a perspective so different from You on this subject of sufficiency. I have repeatedly behaved as though the Christian life depended upon what I thought I could do from my own resources, and, Lord, as You have declared, it has brought forth spiritual deadness. Please teach me to trust in Your Holy Spirit to bring forth into my experience the full sufficiency of Your immeasurable grace, in Jesus name, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


22 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                                                     The New and Living Way
 
Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He consecrated for us. (Heb_10:19-20)

Here, life under the new covenant of grace is described as the “new and living way.” This could be contrasted with the “old and dying way” of attempting to live under the old covenant of law. The “newness” of grace is not really a matter of time sequence, because the grace of God actually precedes the law in man’s history with God. The “tree of life” in the garden of Eden was God’s provision of grace for Adam and Eve. The promises of God to Abraham, given hundreds of years before the law, depended upon the faithful grace of God, not the legal performance of Abraham.

The “newness” of grace is its every day freshness and vitality. Day by day, by the grace of God, fresh measures of life are abundantly available to those who look to the Lord as their supply. This makes life with God fresh and new every day.

Under the old covenant, only one person, the High Priest, could enter into the intimate presence of God, the Holy of Holies. Furthermore, this was only allowed one day a year. Such limited access would certainly “get old” in the hearts of all who hungered after the living God.

Now, under the new covenant of grace, every believer in Jesus, our great High Priest, can confidently approach the Lord personally any moment of every day. “Having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus.” Through the shed blood of Jesus Christ, which forgives all of our sins, we can speak to the Lord and enjoy His presence in our lives continually.

Jeremiah gave some early insight into this kind of fresh and vital relationship with God. “Through the Lord’s mercies we are not consumed, because His compassions fail not. They are new every morning; great is Your faithfulness. ‘The LORD is my portion,’ says my soul, ‘Therefore I hope in Him! ‘” (Lam_3:22-24).

The Apostle Paul wrote profoundly concerning such “newness.” “But now we have been delivered from the law, having died to what we were held by, so that we should serve in the newness of the Spirit and not in the oldness of the letter” (Rom_7:6). This the “new and living way.” This will never “get old.”

Prayer:

O Lord of Life, my heart yearns for this new and living way. O, how I long to dwell in Your presence day by day! Lord, I must confess that every attempt to base intimacy with You on my best performance has always become so old and dying, so stale and lifeless. My soul is stirred with hope in You that You have provided this better way. O Lord, teach me to walk by this new and living way, in the name of Jesus, my great High Priest, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


21 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                       The New Covenant Inaugurated for the Church

But now He has obtained a more excellent ministry, inasmuch as He is also Mediator of a better covenant, which was established on better promises . . . And the Holy Spirit also witnesses to us . . . This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, says the Lord: I will put My laws into their hearts . . . Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He consecrated for us. (Heb_8:6; Heb_10:15-16, Heb_10:19-20)

This new covenant of grace that is promised to Israel eventually has already been inaugurated for the church now. The book of Hebrews documents this fact repeatedly. “But now He has obtained a more excellent ministry, inasmuch as He is also Mediator of a better covenant, which was established on better promises.” Here in chapter 8, verse 6, the new covenant is referred to as “a better covenant.” Then, the instituting of this new covenant is described in the past tense, “was established.” It is already put into operation for the church.

In Heb_10:16, the promise of the new covenant in Jeremiah 31 is quoted. “This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, says the Lord: I will put My laws into their hearts.” In the previous verse, we are told that this quote from Jeremiah includes a message from the Holy Spirit to us, the church of Jesus Christ. “And the Holy Spirit also witnesses to us.”

Furthermore, in Heb_10:19-20, the new covenant is applied to the access of the “brethren” (the church, God’s children) to their holy God and Father. “Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He consecrated for us.” Through His death on the cross, Jesus consecrated (that is, inaugurated, instituted, established, put into operation) the new covenant for us today!

Of course, this all fits perfectly with the application of the new covenant to the church celebrating the Lord’s Supper. “In the same manner He also took the cup after supper, saying, ‘This cup is the new covenant in My blood’ ” (1Co_11:25).

Prayer:

Dear Lord of Glory, I rejoice with great gladness that Your new covenant of grace is the wondrous manner in which I am invited to relate to You. In this rich covenant I have found forgiveness of all my sins. Praise be to Your name! In this bountiful arrangement I can grow in intimacy with You. Blessed be Your name! In this generous provision I anticipate being changed and enabled by You from deep within my heart. Glory be to Your name forevermore! Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


20 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                                           The Promise of a New Covenant

“Behold, the days are coming,” says the LORD, “when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel . . . I will put My law in their minds, and write it on their hearts; and I will be their God, and they shall be My people . . . they all shall know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them,” says the LORD. “For I will forgive their iniquity, and their sin I will remember no more.” (Jer_31:31, Jer_31:33-34)

Long ago God promised a new covenant of grace for His people Israel. “I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel.” Someday the Israelites will turn to Messiah as a group and enter into this promised covenant of grace. “And so all Israel will be saved, as it is written: “The Deliverer will come out of Zion, and He will turn away ungodliness from Jacob; For this is My covenant with them, when I take away their sins” (Rom_11:26-27). This will take place when the Lord Jesus returns to this earth. “And I will pour on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem the Spirit of grace and supplication; then they will look on Me whom they have pierced; they will mourn for Him as one mourns for his only son, and grieve for Him as one grieves for a firstborn” (Zec_12:10).

Meanwhile, the church of the Lord Jesus, comprised of all Jewish and Gentile believers in Christ, already has the new covenant instituted for her. “This cup is the new covenant in My blood” (Luk_22:20).

Note the astounding three-fold provisions this new covenant offers by faith to all believers today. First, there is the forgiveness of sins. “For I will forgive their iniquity, and their sin I will remember no more.” Second, there is the opportunity to have an intimate relationship with God. “They all shall know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them.” Third, there is the internal working of the Lord God Almighty enabling and changing people’s lives from the inner core of their being. “I will put My law in their minds, and write it on their hearts.”

Prayer:

Almighty God, the provisions of Your new covenant of grace are staggering in their richness! Forgiveness of sins by You, intimacy with You, and inner transformation from You – – all of this is mine through faith in Your Son, my Savior. O Lord, what bountiful grace You make available to us in Christ! I fully and desperately need all three of these wondrous workings that You alone can provide. I praise You for the gift of forgiveness of sins. I seek You for increased intimacy with You. I look to You to be shaping my life according to Your will, from the inside out, all through the grace of my Lord Jesus Christ, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


19 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                               Law and Grace, Old Covenant and New Covenant

The LORD gave me the two tablets of stone, the tablets of the covenant . . . For the law was given through Moses, but grace and truth came through Jesus Christ . . . This cup is the new covenant in My blood. (Deu_9:11; Joh_1:17; and Luk_22:20)

In our meditations upon law and grace, we have also been considering (though not yet mentioning) the principal characteristics of the Old Covenant and the New Covenant. When the Lord wrote the message of His law upon stone tablets for Moses, He was prescribing the terms of the Old Covenant. “The LORD gave me the two tablets of stone, the tablets of the covenant.” When Jesus came into the world to die on the cross, the Lord was establishing a New Covenant. “This cup is the new covenant in My blood.”

These two covenants of law and grace present one of the major contrasting themes in the word of God. “For the law was given through Moses, but grace and truth came through Jesus Christ…” Understanding the differences between these two covenants is of utmost importance for living the Christian life as God intends.

God’s law tells us that He desires holiness to characterize the way we live. Only God’s grace can provide such righteousness in our lives. God’s law tells us that He wants Christlike love to permeate our attitudes and relationships. Only God’s grace can develop such love in us. God’s law tells us that He desires the perfections of the Father to be growing in us. Only God’s grace is sufficient to carry out such a process of transformation.

The law of God is the what; the grace of God is the how. The law of God reveals sin; the grace of God forgives sin. The law of God indicates man’s problem; the grace of God provides God’s remedy. The law of God demands performance by man; the grace of God offers provision from God.

The law of God is the standard; the grace of God is the means. The law of God is the spiritual measuring rod that evaluates lives; the grace of God is the nurturing resource that produces spiritual life. The law of God tells us of the character of God; the grace of God reproduces that character in us. The law of God is the effect God wants to see; the grace of God is the cause that brings forth that effect.

Prayer:

Lord God of Truth, help me to rightly divide Your truth. Enlighten my spiritual understanding that I might increasingly grasp the differences between law and grace. Show me the full implications of the old covenant and the new covenant.Your word impresses me with the enormous significance of these issues. Thank You for Your patience concerning my negligence or confusion on these matters. O Lord, I earnestly desire to live a righteous and holy life. Teach me the path of humble dependence upon Your glorious grace, through Jesus, my Lord and my life, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


18 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                            Righteousness through Christ in Sanctification

For what the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, God did by sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, on account of sin: He condemned sin in the flesh, that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us who do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit. (Rom_8:3-4)

How wonderful it is to be “justified freely by His grace” (Rom_3:24). Yet, what disappointment and discouragement awaits us, if we do not learn that God desires to sanctify us freely by His grace as well. This plan of God, as we should expect, hinges upon the work of Jesus Christ.

In matters of justification, as well as sanctification, the law has a weakness. This weakness is that natural human resources, the flesh of man, cannot live up to the standards of God. Thus, to accomplish what the law could never accomplish the Father sent his Son. “For what the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, God did by sending His own Son.”

Jesus came as a man and died on the cross to eradicate the consequences of sin. This death of Christ certainly provided justification for all who would believe in the Lord Jesus. Yet, the next verse reveals that through His sacrificial death on the cross progressive, practical sanctification is available day by day through faith in the Lord. “That the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us who do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.”

The word “walk” makes Rom_8:4 a verse on sanctification, not justification. Justification takes place with the first moment of faith in Christ. Sanctification continues step by step, day by day, throughout the life of a believer.

Think of this grand truth. God’s grace provides a way “that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us.” Remember, that heavenly demand is “be holy,” be like Christ. This transformation of life takes place daily in the life of any believer who does “not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.” If we renounce the natural resources of man and trust in the Lord Jesus step by step through life, His Holy Spirit accomplishes His sanctifying work in us by the grace of God.

Prayer:

O Lord of compassion and generosity, what bountiful grace You offer to us, grace that justifies and grace that sanctifies. How foolish and unnecessary have been my futile attempts to fulfill the lofty requirements of Your holy law by my own feeble efforts. Father, how thrilling and encouraging to see that You have provided a gracious and effective way for me to grow in Christlikeness. This day I place my hope for godly progress in the irreplaceable work of Your Holy Spirit in me, in Jesus name, Amen.
                                          
Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


17 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                             Righteousness through Christ in Justification

But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets, even the righteousness of God which is through faith in Jesus Christ to all and on all who believe. For there is no difference; for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by His grace (Rom_3:21-24)

The basic manner in which Jesus fulfills the law of God for us is by justifying us “freely by His grace.” He does this by offering us “the righteousness of God which is through faith.”

In the gospel of Jesus Christ, “the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed.” It is the same righteousness that is spoken of in the law, that is, “being witnessed by the Law.” However, in the law righteousness is an impossible standard being imposed. In the gospel, it is a gracious gift being offered.

This gift of righteousness is available to all who believe, to all who put their trust in the Lord Jesus Christ to be their Savior and Lord. This gift is, of course, free to the recipients. Yet, it was made available at great cost to the giver. This gift cost the Father His only begotten Son. This gift cost the Son His own life, as He paid the price of redemption to buy us back from the slave market of sin and death.

Every person ever created needs this redemption price paid for them. “For there is no difference; for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” Now, for all who believe in the Lord Jesus, the righteousness of God is imputed to them, that is, credited as a gift to their heavenly account. Thereby, the Lord God justifies us “freely by His grace.” The Lord declares us righteous is in sight by giving to us “the righteousness of God which is through faith.”

Prayer:

Dear Lord, I am so grateful that Your message of righteousness did not come through the law alone. Otherwise, Lord, I would have stood condemned before You forever. Thank You for speaking to us of righteousness through Your glorious gospel of grace. I exult in You that I am now righteous in Your sight, through faith in Your beloved Son. Lord, I am learning that the righteousness I need for daily sanctification must also come from Jesus, by that same grace, through that same kind of trust. What good, good news is Your grand gospel! I magnify and praise You through Christ, my Lord, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


16 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                                                 Jesus Fulfilling the Law

Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. (Mat_5:17)

The standard of the law of God is infinitely high and lofty: “be holy, be loving, be perfect.” This is because the law reflects the very character of God. In light of this we may wonder if there is any way that the law can be fulfilled. How could the righteous demands of the law ever be met in our lives? The answer to this vital question is contained in the truth that Jesus came to “to fulfill” the law.

Consider how comprehensive was Jesus’ fulfillment of the law. He fulfilled the law in His life, becoming our example. As Jesus lived, He showed us what life would look like if one could always, in every way, live up to the heavenly standards of God. Jesus’ testimony was “I always do those things that please Him” (Joh_8:29).

Further, He fulfilled the law in His death, becoming our substitutionary sacrifice. The law included a penalty for violation, and that penalty was death. “The soul who sins shall die” (Eze_18:4). “For the wages of sin is death” (Rom_6:23). Jesus lovingly died in our place to pay that penalty which we owed. “But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom_5:8).

Additionally, He wants to fulfill the law now in our daily experience, by being our life. “Christ who is our life” (Col_3:4). The Lord Jesus wants to live in and through the lives of His disciples, as we daily put our faith in Him. “It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God” (Gal_2:20).

Yes, Jesus fulfills the law comprehensively!

Prayer:

Dear Father of Glory, what marvelous grace – – what marvelous grace! Such a thorough provision is supplied by Your grace. Through the work of Jesus, my Lord, the law is fulfilled. Its holy demands are met on my behalf. My failure before Your law is fully covered by Your grace. Lord Jesus, thank You for paying the penalty for my sins. My desire to grow in the righteous life that You lived, and that the law describes, is fully available by Your grace. O Lord, this is grace upon grace. For this I praise You, and I rejoice with expectation. Lord Jesus, by faith I now look to You to be my life this day. Lord, inhabit my heart and shape my attitudes, my words, my relationships, and my deeds, I pray in Your mighty name, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


15 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Today’s VOTD comes from Day-By-Day By Grace from the pen of Bob Hoekstra.

                                                      The Law Tutoring People to Christ

Therefore the law was our tutor to bring us to Christ, that we might be justified by faith. But after faith has come, we are no longer under a tutor. (Gal_3:24-25)

The ultimate ability of the law of God is its capacity to tutor people to Christ. “The law was our tutor to bring us to Christ.” It is the plan of God to use His law to inform us about our great need for Jesus Christ. Remember the summaries of the law of God: “be holy, be loving, be perfect.”

The law demands that we be holy. We are convicted that we are not holy. Thereby, the law is saying to us: “You need Jesus Christ.” The law requires that we be loving. We realize that we are not loving. Thereby, the law is declaring to us: “You need Jesus Christ.” The law insists that we be perfect. We know that we are not perfect. Thereby, the law is announcing to us: “You need Jesus Christ.” In this process the law functions as tutor (schoolmaster or child-trainer) instructing people of their need for that which only Christ can provide through His grace.

Now that we have responded to the law’s tutoring work, we are no longer under the tutor. Now that we have placed our faith in Jesus Christ, we are no longer under the law. “But after faith has come, we are no longer under a tutor.”

Whereas we once were told by the law to be holy, now we look to Christ for all personal holiness. “But of Him you are in Christ Jesus, who became for us . . . righteousness and sanctification” (1Co_1:30).

Whereas we once were told by the law to be loving, now we look to the Spirit of Christ for all the love that our lives are to show forth. “But the fruit of the Spirit is love” (Gal_5:22).

Whereas we once were told by the law to be perfect, now we look to the Lord for all of the perfecting process. “Being confident of this very thing, that He who has begun a good work in you will complete it until the day of Jesus Christ” (Php_1:6).

Prayer:

O Lord, my Redeemer, thank You for using Your law as a tutor to lead me to Jesus Christ. Your law was so correct regarding my desperate need of a Savior. Now I rejoice that I am no longer under that tutor. What a delight to relate to You by faith and not by performance. What a precious blessing to humbly hope in the Lord Jesus for righteousness and love and growth. How wonderful to look to a gracious, loving Person, the Lord Jesus, instead of to a perfect unyielding standard, the law. Lord Jesus, please complete in me the good work of Your grace that began when I first believed in You. In Your name, and for Your glory, I pray, Amen.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 


14 January 2017 Verse of the Day

Colossians 4:1 NASB  Masters, grant to your slaves justice and fairness, knowing that you too have a Master in heaven.

Well, just as we don’t have salves today as it was stated in Colossians 3:22, so we don’t have masters today.  Colossians 3:22 NASB  Slaves, in all things obey those who are your masters on earth, not with external service, as those who merely please men, but with sincerity of heart, fearing the Lord.  But just as the principles from this verse were true for us as workers that work for a paycheck and sometimes we feel like we work like slaves, so the principles of our current VOTD are true for masters or managers that have people that work for them.  We want to apply these principles to those of us who manage people, for those of us who are called supervisors, or managers or even bosses.

When our VOTD says masters, grant to your slaves, to me it is the same thing as saying managers, grant to your people.  God’s Holy Word gives us principles, guide lines to live by, not laws and rules to obey.  His principles give the Spirit of the law, not the letter of the law.  That is why, on the Sermon on the Mount, found in Matthew chapters 5-7, He says over and over again: Matthew 5:21 KJV  Ye have heard that it was said, … but then Jesus goes on to say in the very next verse: Matthew 5:22 KJV  But I say unto you, …  The scribes and Pharisees wanted to live by the letter of the law but God wants to live by the Spirit of the law.  That is why Jesus says to us:  “Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint and dill and cummin, and have neglected the weightier provisions of the law: justice and mercy and faithfulness; but these are the things you should have done without neglecting the others. “You blind guides, who strain out a gnat and swallow a camel! (Matthew 23:23-24 NASB).

So who does our current VOTD apply to?  Well, for sure, the principles of this VOTD applies to your manager, your boss, or whatever term you apply to him or her.  But I want you to see that the principles of this VOTD also apply to you.  For you see at some point in time, you will be a manager.  No, I am not talking about when you get promoted sometime in the future…. No, no.  I am talking about now.  You see ALL of us are a manager of other people from time to time.  Even if there are only two of you, usually one is the leader, one is the manager of the situation.  Whoever is the expert at the task at hand or who has been appointed the primary role for getting the job done is the master in that situation.  It makes no difference what the task is, someone has to be the “point person,” the leader, the manager.  And then the principles of this verse apply to that person.  It could be you when you are teaching your children how to do some task.  It could by you when you are showing your neighbor how to fix something.  It could be you when you are with a friend and you want to show them how to do something.  We are ALL leaders, trainers or managers of other people from time to time and so the principles of this VOTD applies to ALL of us from time to time.

So what are the principles that God wants us to know and to apply as managers of other people that come from this VOTD?  Two words: justice and fairness.  God wants us to apply justice and fairness in every situation that we are involved in as managers of people.  So let’s define the terms and then apply the principals involved.  Webster’s says: justice: The virtue which consists in giving to everyone what is his due; practical conformity to the laws and to principles of rectitude in the dealings of men with each other; honesty; integrity in commerce or mutual intercourse.  Impartiality; equal distribution of right in expressing opinions; fair representation of facts respecting merit or demerit.  Equity; agreeableness to right; as, he proved the justice of his claim.

We can see from the definition that as we think about applying this term of justice that we are going to have to be impartial and fair in our dealings with those who we manage.  We can’t treat one differently by being partial and showing favoritism.  We are not to play favorites.  We need to treat all equally, honestly and with integrity when we work with and manage others.  Which brings us to the second principle that God want us to show: Fairness.  Some of Webster’s terms say:  Frankness; candor; hence, honesty; ingenuousness; as fairness in trade.  Openness; candor; freedom from disguise, insidiousness or prevarication; as the fairness of an argument.  Equality of terms; equity; as the fairness of a contract.  Again, we find that God wants us to be upright in our dealings and honest in our actions as we work and manage other people in the situation.

Both of these terms fall under the umbrella of: … ‘YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF.’  (Matthew 22:39 NASB).  You are showing love when you are showing justice and fairness to those whom you are managing, to those whom you are leading, to those whom God has put in your charge.  So just as you should always follow God’s principle of:  Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men (Colossians 3:23 NASB).  So you should always in every situation, treat others with justice and fairness.  Why? Because you know this principle is true also: knowing that you too have a Master in heaven.  Because God does not show partiality: … “I most certainly understand now that God is not one to show partiality (Acts 10:34 NASB).  For he who does wrong will receive the consequences of the wrong which he has done, and that without partiality (Colossians 3:25 NASB).

Lord, please help me in every situation and every circumstance, treat others with justice and fairness.  Lord, I want to be a doer of your word in all that I say and do.  I want to please you in not only my actions but also in my thoughts and my desires.  Lord, help me to be the man that I should be by convicting me of my sin even as the wrong thought enters into my mind.  Help me to forsake any bad habits that I might have that don’t show love and respect for my neighbor.  Lord, I love you.

Yours in Christ,
Bob Maynard

 



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